When was the last time that you were formally evaluated as a teacher? Chances are, if you are been teaching for longer than 3 years in the same school division, you no longer need to endure having an administrator come and formally evaluate you. While there is a great relief in securing a permanent teaching contract, I think we are missing opportunities for greatness.

Jim Collins reminds us that

“We don’t have great schools principally because we have good schools”.

Good is the enemy of greatness. I’m not content with just having a good school. I want a great school. Our students deserve great schools. Since schools don’t need to compete with one another (for the most part) we can all have great schools!

I am convinced that the best way to have great schools is to:

Ensure that we have outstanding teachers in every class everyday.

In our school, all teachers receive at least 2 formal observations every year, regardless of how long they have been teaching. Beginning teachers receive the most observations and a formal evaluative report is developed. Experienced teachers receive feedback but no overall report is given – teachers are asked to show reflection in their professional growth plan. In addition to formal observations, all administrators conduct frequent walkthroughs.

I don’t presume to be the best teacher in the school. In fact, this simple realization has often kept me from giving people the meaningful feedback that they deserve. See my post The Reluctant Leader for more details. However, I am convinced that teachers deserve to be effectively coached so that they can achieve greatness.

In fact, we are changing  our terminology from Supervision and Evaluation (which assumes judgement, superiority, and ratings) to Coaching. Coaching, seems to connote a mutual acceptance of the roles that need to be played in order to improvement to occur. As an administrator, it also reminds me that I don’t have to be the best practitioner in order to know what good practice looks like and to be able to provide meaningful feedback to teachers.

We are also encouraging peer observations and instructional rounds to constantly promote a culture of constant improvement, transparency, and trust. This is a huge departure from the traditional model where an administrator only evaluates beginning teachers and then close their doors and teach isolated for the rest of their careers. Is it scary? Absolutely. Will it make us a stronger learning community? Yup. Will it help us to become a great school? Absolutely.

Advertisements